Training Day @ Starbucks

Wasn’t there a movie called Training Day? Well, we could make another one today as Starbucks closes 8,000 stores to “train” employees in unconscious bias.

The article on MSN quoted the consultant who developed and will deliver the training as saying “the real work is for employees to apply what they learn in their everyday lives. She likened it to exercising a muscle.” I’m glad at least the consultant understands that one half day of “training” will not necessarily change behavior.

What about the leadership? Do they recognize that the cultural infrastructure also must change? What about the employees hired tomorrow and beyond? Will the urgency of the Philadelphia situation fade over time, and everything go back to “normal?”

What about a different approach?

What about developing the skill of leadership to hire, observe, coach and, if necessary, counsel their employees about appropriate behavior in front of customers. After all, every situation is different, and every situation has the chance of going south as the unfortunate situation in Philadelphia went south. (more…)

“Sex, Lies and Human Resources*”

*Note: Not my title. This is a quoted title of an article on page 240 of the March 2018 edition of Marie Claire. Featured on the front page, no less.

When I first started in HR, no one knew who we were. Heck, we weren’t even HR back then. In 2005, popular business magazine Fast Company brought HR into the spotlight, in a not-so-gracious way, with a cover story stating “Why We Hate HR.” One of the more pithy comments was:

”The human-resources trade long ago proved itself, at best, a necessary evil — and at worst, a dark bureaucratic force that blindly enforces nonsensical rules resists creativity, and impedes constructive change.”

Some may chastise me for a 13-years-old reference, however, ten year later Harvard Business Review again spotlighted all that is wrong with HR, dedicating a whole volume to their perception that “It’s Time To Blow Up HR.” It doesn’t take much time to see that the complaints are pretty similar to those made in Fast Company in 2005. (more…)

Consequences for Inaction. Finally.


You may have missed this; I almost did. It was just a page 9 article in our local paper. The title was “Weinstein Co. board fires president David Glasser ‘for cause.’”

I had no idea who David Glasser was; I’d become pretty familiar with the name “Weinstein,” so I stopped to read the article. Here’s what caught my eye.

“New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman singled out Glasser [in a lawsuit filed against the Weinstein company,] accusing him of not responding to complaints to the company’s human resources department about Harvey Weinstein.”

So, it goes on to say…

“The board of the Weinstein Company has unanimously voted to terminate David Glasser for cause.”

Glasser had been on tap to replace Weinstein as CEO – the New York Attorney General apparently had other ideas. The article goes on… (more…)