Who are consequences really for?

consequences

Ryan Lochte certainly did realize severe consequences to his childish actions in Rio. They hit him where it really hurts – in the pocketbook.

One hopes that Lochte learns from this experience, grows up and becomes a responsible adult.  Maybe.

If, however, what happened to Lochte serves to influence other young athletes to be wise about their fame, that is a good outcome. Continue reading Who are consequences really for?

Don’t be embarrassed…

embarrassAn article titled “These Ten Policies Are An Embarrassment to the HR Profession” appeared in my newsfeed yesterday. Posted by Liz Ryan in Forbes, I devoured the content and tweeted it to my network saying, “Right on! Absolutely! Embarrassing is a good word!

I read it again this morning, and had a slightly different reaction. I really like Liz Ryan’s writing; she says it like it is – no words minced. And what she says always makes sense. I nod my head and go, “Yup.”

But then I came back down to earth and realized that, while the words resonate, thar’s danger in them, thar waters.

In the post, she slams policies like progressive discipline, doctors’ notes for absences, funeral notices to justify bereavement leave and reference policies that prohibit managers from providing references for their employees.  There are others, but these I mention all share the element of trust. If trust were present, there really would be no need for policies such as these.  Can’t argue there. Continue reading Don’t be embarrassed…

Hey HR, you’re missing something important

connectorWhat are we missing? How about organizational learning?

Today’s complex and changing world requires continuous learning within organizations in order to be competitive, and there is no better leader for learning than HR. Often though, HR places the majority of their attention on administration rather than on learning. This is understandable given the huge risk associated with benefits, employee relations and HR technology, but it is a mistake.

This hit home to me recently when a fellow HR professional whom I regard very highly, called to ask me about the concept of learning. She was preparing to present to an internal client group that wanted to become a learning organization. With several decades and an MBA behind her, she was unfamiliar with those very concepts of learning that can place HR in a business leadership role.

She is not alone. HR professionals today are overwhelmed with hiring, benefits, compensation, employee relations, technology and data, and tend to function within the comfort of those silos.  They struggle to find the time to reach beyond the requirements of administration and focus on learning, but a shift in investment of HR time can pay dividends in business results. Continue reading Hey HR, you’re missing something important

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